Long service leave

An employee gets long service leave after a long period of working for the same employer.

Most employees' entitlement to long service leave comes from long service leave laws in each state or territory. These laws set out:

  • how long an employee has to be working to get long service leave (eg. after 7 years)
  • how much long service leave the employee gets.

In some states and territories long serving casuals are eligible for long service leave.

To find out about long service leave entitlements, contact the long service leave agency in your state or territory:

Long service leave in pre-modern awards

The state and territory long service leave laws don't apply when there are long service leave entitlements in a federal pre-modern award that would have covered an employer and their employees before 1 January 2010. 

In this case the long service leave entitlement comes from the pre-modern award which will set out:

  • how long an employee has to be working to get long service leave (eg. after 7 years)
  • how much long service leave the employee gets.

Example: Long service leave in a pre-modern award

Real Meats Butchers has a number of shops throughout Melbourne, Victoria, and is covered by the Meat Award. Lesley has been working part-time for 12 years.

There was a clause covering long service leave under Lesley’s federal pre-modern award. This means that Lesley's long service leave entitlement comes from her federal pre-modern award, not the Victorian long service leave legislation.

To find long service leave entitlements in a federal pre-modern award:

Before you call, please look at our Before you call page.

Portable long service leave

Australian states and territories have legislation to provide employees in the coal mining, cleaning and building and construction industries with access to portable long service leave.

This means an employee keeps their long service leave entitlement even if they work on different projects for one or more employers.

For portable long service leave in the:

Source reference: Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) section 113 external-icon.png

Think a mistake might have been made?

Mistakes can happen. The best way to fix them usually starts with talking.

Check out our Help resolving workplace issues section for practical advice on:

  • figuring out if a mistake has been made
  • talking to your employer or employee about fixing it
  • getting help from us if you can't resolve it.

Help for small business

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