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National findings

During the campaign, the entitlements of 2266 apprentices were checked. These apprentices were employed by 822 businesses that were audited, including:

  • 214 businesses that only employed first year apprentices;
  • 307 businesses that only employed non-first year apprentices; and
  • 301 businesses that employed both first year and non-first year apprentices.

Figure 1 shows that apprentices that worked for a business with only first-year apprentices were less likely to have issues with their pay and records than apprentices working for businesses without first year apprentices. Apprentices that worked for a business with both first and non-first year apprentices were even less likely to have errors for their pay and employment records. 

Figure 1: Compliance by Apprenticeship Levels

Figure 1: Compliance by Apprenticeship Levels

The more apprentices a business employs, the less likely the apprentice is to have issues with their pay and employment records. Figure 2 shows that compliance rates for businesses increases with the number of apprentices employed.

Figure 2: Compliance by Number of Apprentices per Business

Figure 2: Compliance by Number of Apprentices per Business

This is consistent with compliance rates by the number of employees (all employees, not just apprentices) as per Figure 3. The more employees a business has, the less likely an apprentice will have errors with their pay or records.

Figure 3: Compliance by Business Size

Figure 3: Compliance by Business Size

Of the 822 businesses that employed apprentices:

  • 443 (54%) were compliant with all requirements for their apprentices; and
  • 378 (46%) had at least one error:
    • 201 (24%) had errors relating to apprentice pay rates;
    • 115 (14%) had errors relating to apprentice pay slips or record-keeping; and
    • 62 (8%) had both pay rate and records/pay slip errors.

Figure 4: Compliance Rates

Figure 4: Compliance Rates

This means that:

  • 644 (78%) businesses were compliant with their apprentice record-keeping and pay slip requirements;
  • 558 (68%) were paying their apprentices correctly;
  • $339 433 was recovered on behalf of 323 apprentices, with an average recovery of $1050.87 per apprentice; and
  • 54 formal cautions, seven (7) Compliance Notices and five (5) Infringement Notices (on the spot fines) were issued. 

Findings from the National Building and Construction Industry Campaign 2014/2015 show a higher overall compliance rate for businesses engaging apprentices compared to results from the National Apprenticeship Campaign 2015 as per Figure 3. This is consistent with the higher overall compliance rates identified across all Building and Construction Industry businesses (including those without apprentices).

Figure 5: Apprenticeship Compliance Rates in the Building and Construction Industry Campaign

Figure 5: Apprenticeship compliance rates in building and construction industry campaign