Textile, clothing and footwear campaign - help for workers

We are currently in the compliance phase of this campaign. This means that we are auditing businesses (including field visits) within the textile, clothing and footwear industry to see if they're meeting their legal obligations under the Textile award. Employers will be audited on matters such as record-keeping, pay rates (including allowances), and whether the business is registered with the Board of Reference.

For insights and outcomes from the education phase of this Campaign, read our Textile, Clothing and Footwear Campaign Education Phase Report on our Campaign reports page.

The textile, clothing and footwear (‘TCF’) industry includes people who make or finish clothing, bags and footwear as well as people involved in the manufacture of buttons or textiles.

People who work in this industry are typically outworkers or work from the employer’s place of business like a factory or warehouse. They are covered by the Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Associated Industries Award 2010 (Textile Award) external-icon.png .

The entitlements for each type of worker are different. Find help for:

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Are you working as an outworker?

Outworkers usually work from their home or garage rather than the employer’s factory.

If you are working as an outworker, you’re entitled to the following:

Minimum conditions

The Textile Award says you should:

  • be engaged on a full-time or regular part-time basis
  • be paid at least $19.53 per hour
  • receive at least the hourly award rate of pay even if you are a pieceworker
  • get overtime, allowances and penalties as set out in the award
  • get the minimum entitlements in the National Employment Standards.

Written agreements

Your employer must enter into a written agreement with you before you start working as an outworker. The agreement must set out whether you will work full-time or part-time. If you are a part-time outworker the agreement should also include information about:

  • the number of hours you will work each week
  • whether the hours will be averaged over a longer period.

The agreement must be clear and simple. Your employer must give you a copy of the agreement a reasonable time before it is signed. It must also be provided to you in a language that you understand.

Work records

Your employer should provide you with a work record before you start work.

This record must contain information such as:

  • Your employer’s name and address
  • The address where you will perform the work
  • The time and date for starting and finishing the work (including delivery and pick up times)
  • A description of the work required
  • The number of garments, articles or materials
  • The time standard for the work required
  • The price to be paid for each garment, article or material
  • The number of working hours you have to complete the work
  • The total amount to be paid to you

Information you must be given

Your employer must give you a copy of Schedule F of the Textile Award. This information must be in a language that you understand.

Schedule F includes an information sheet. This sets out some of the entitlements you must get including:

  • rates of pay
  • hours of work
  • leave and public holidays.

Are you working in the employer's factory or warehouse?

If you are employed to work within the employer’s factory or warehouse, you’re entitled to the following:

Minimum conditions

The Textile Award says you should:

  • be paid at least the minimum hourly rates set out in the award
  • receive at least the hourly award rate of pay even if you are a pieceworker
  • get overtime, allowances and penalties as set out in the award
  • be provided with the unpaid lunch breaks and paid rest breaks set out in the award
  • get the minimum entitlements in the National Employment Standards.

Hours of work

If you are a full-time employee you will work 38 hours each week. You can agree with your employer to average these hours over a period of up to 4 weeks. This means you may work more than 38 hours one week, but less in another.

If you are a part-time employee you will work less than 38 hours each week. You and your employer must make an agreement to set out your regular pattern of work. This means it should state what hours you will work each day, as well as your starting and finishing times.

If you are a casual employee you will work on an hourly or daily basis. You are entitled to receive a casual loading (as at 1 July 2017, this is 25%) and a minimum payment for three hours work.

What information should you have access to?

Your employer must make sure that all employees can access a copy of the Textile Award and the National Employment Standards. This information can be placed on a noticeboard or provided electronically.

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