Casual, full-time and part-time work

To work out the right pay and conditions you’ll need to know whether an employee is full-time, part-time or casual.

Under most awards, employers need to tell new employees whether they're hired as full-time, part-time or casual.

Full-time

Full-time employees work an average of 38 hours per week and usually have ongoing employment.

Full-time employees are entitled to all of the conditions of the National Employment Standards including:

  • maximum number of hours of work per week,
  • paid annual and personal (sick) leave,
  • public holidays
  • notice when they lose their job.

Other conditions will come from any award or agreement that applies.

Part-time

Part-time employees work an average of less than 38 hours per week. They're usually hired on an ongoing basis and work the same set of hours.

Part-time employees are entitled to the same things as full-time employees, but on a ‘pro rata’ basis - which means that it’s based on the number of hours they work.

Example

Under the National Employment Standards, employees get 4 weeks annual leave every year.

Jacqui is part-time and works 20 hours every week. Over a year Jacqui accumulates 4 part-time weeks (80 hours) of annual leave.

Jacqui’s colleague, Andrew, is full-time. He works 38 hours every week. Over a year Andrew accumulates 4 full-time weeks (152 hours) of annual leave.

Casual

Casual employees are paid based on the number of hours they work. They usually aren’t guaranteed a certain amount of hours of work per week, but can work regular hours.

Casuals are paid a higher rate of pay, called a ‘casual loading’, instead of some the benefits that full-time and part-time employees get. For example, casuals don’t usually get paid annual leave or paid sick leave.

See the Casual employees section for more information, including how the National Employment Standards apply, notice of termination and some of the other conditions casuals can get.

Find out more:

Back to top

Page last updated: 26 Nov 2012